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Evento: 'Seminários no LCG: Dinesh Manocha e Ming C. Lin'

Eventos PESC (Palestras, Seminários, etc.)
Palestras, Seminários, etc. do PESC/COPPE/UFRJ.
Data: Monday, July 02, 2012 At 13:30
Duração: 4 Horas

Segunda-feira (02/07) teremos dois convidados de honra no LCG, o Dinesh Manocha e a Ming C. Lin.
Teremos uma tarde de super seminários, primeiro o Dinesh às 13:30, um coffe break, e em seguida a Ming Lin às 15:30, todos na H324-B.

Dinesh Manocha
Department of Computer Science
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

http://gamma.cs.unc.edu

Abstract:
From record-setting crowds at rallies and protests to futuristic swarms of robots, our world is currently experiencing a continuing rise of complex, distributed collections of independently acting entities. With potential applications such as computer graphics, predicting crowd disasters, improving robot cooperation, and enabling the next generation of air travel, developing models to reproduce, control, predict and understand these types of systems is becoming critically important.In this talk, I will give an overview of how to use velocity-space planning techniques to compute cooperative motion paths for a group of independent entities sharing the same physical space. I will focus on the special case of simulating human-like crowds, with applications to computer animation and architectural analysis. Specific topics will include optimization-based strategies for distributed collision avoidance, uses of the principle of least effort for simulating crowds, and data-driven strategies for modeling differences in personalities. The talk will also cover related techniques needed to achieve accurate simulations of large-scale crowds such as efficient parallel/SIMD compute models and methods of validating simulationsagainst real world data and will discuss how velocity-space motion planning can be applied to collision avoidance for distributed robotic systems.

Bio:
Dinesh Manocha is currently the Phi Delta Theta/Mason Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has co-authored than 330 papers in the leading conferences and journals on computer graphics, robotics, and scientific computing. He has also served program chair for many conferences and editorial boards of many leading journals. Some of the software systems related to collision detection, GPU-based algorithms and geometric computing developed by his group have been downloaded by more than 100,000 users and are widely used in the industry. Manocha has received awards including Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, NSF Career Award, Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, and 12 best paper awards at the leading conferences. He is a Fellow of ACM, AAAS, and IEEE and Distinguished Alumni Award from Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi.

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Ming C. Lin
Department of Computer Science
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

http://www.cs.unc.edu/~lin
http://gamma.cs.unc.edu

Abstract:
From turbulent fluid flow to chaotic traffic patterns, many phenomena observed in nature and in society show complex emergent behavior on different scales. The modeling and simulation of such phenomena continues to intrigue scientists and researchers across different fields, from computational sciences, traffic engineering, urban planning, to social sciences. Understanding and reproducing the visual appearance and dynamic behavior of such complex phenomena through simulation is valuable for enhancing the realism of virtual scenes and for improving the efficiency of design evaluation. This is especially important for interactive applications, where it is impossible to manually animate all the possible interactions and responses beforehand. In this talk, we introduce several hybrid models that synthesize together macroscopic models of the large-scale flows and local representations of small-scale behaviors to capture both the aggregate dynamics and fine-grained details of such phenomena with significantly accelerated performance on commodity hardware. Some of the example dynamical systems that I will describe using these hybrid techniques include turbulent fluids, granular flows, traffic visualization, and sound synthesis. I conclude by discussing some possible future directions.


Short biography:
Ming C. Lin is currently John R. & Louise S. Parker Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina (UNC), Chapel Hill. She obtained her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley. She received several honors and awards, including the NSF Young Faculty Career Award, IEEE VGTC Virtual Reality Technical Achievement Award in 2010, and eight best paper awards at international conferences. She is a Fellow of ACM and IEEE. Her research interests include physically-based modeling, virtual environments, sound rendering, haptics, robotics, and geometric computing. She is currently the Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, a member of 6 editorial boards. She also has served on several steering committees and advisory boards of international conferences, as well as government and industrial technical advisory committees.


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